‘Reap What You Sow’ for Transform magazine

p14-16-growdat2017-clairebangser-highres-6535

Youth Crew Members at Grow Dat Youth Farm. Photo by Claire Bangser.

Transform Magazine, the industry publication of IEMA for environment and sustainability professionals, recently ran a thoughtful profile of Grow Dat. I met the author, Huw Morris, when I was speaking at the ‘Sustainable Food and Beveridge’ event as part of the LSE Festival: Beveridge 2.0 this past March.

As you will see, I always love an excuse to quote Wendell Berry. And let it be known that every time I talk about sustainable agricultural practices, I’m directly quoting Grow Dat’s Farmers who are far more knowledgable than me!

From the article:

One of Grow Dat’s founding principles is that the toughest social problems will not be solved by individuals or by one group of people alone. “This is one of the lasting lessons of Hurricane Katrina, a dozen years later,” Jeanne Firth says. The project hires young people from partner schools across New Orleans for its five-month leadership programme. Starting at age 15, they come from across the spectrum – elite private Catholic schools, alternative schools and Louisiana’s Center for Juvenile Offenders. “We intentionally hire young people from a dozen different high schools across the city,” she says. “They are young people who work together but might never normally meet.”

Read the full story here.

Marshall Institute Grant Award

The Marshall Institute at the London School of Economics recently awarded research grants and I am happy to selected as an award recipient. The Marshall Institute aims to increase the impact and effectiveness of private action for public benefit through research, teaching and convening. Grants are given to empirical research (qualitative and quantitative) and the theoretical underpinnings (economic, social, political, moral) of private action for public benefit.

Project abstract:
As private funding is increasingly circulating in development and humanitarian aid, this project will identify the sources of knowledge that inform, inspire and produce such interventions. This research examines the substantial philanthropic activity in foodscapes and food systems in New Orleans more than a decade after Hurricane Katrina. Many projects in New Orleans have been funded or spearheaded by high-profile individuals, and this research seeks to understand the role that celebrity plays in processes of knowledge production.

Read more about the award and other recipients.